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Anyone fancy a 40TB drive for their Humax ?

(11 posts)
  1. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    Pollensa1946

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    I have difficulty filling a 2TB with anything worth watching.

    Sun 15 Oct 2017 19:25:21 #2 |
  3. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    Content isn't the issue finding the time to watch is for me, despite being retired. My post was kind of tongue in cheek

    Nice to know that storage will not be the limitation on any future advancements. With that sort of storage you could record all freeview and freesat channels. Who needs timers, record the lot

    The old Topfield 5800 with the aid of a TAP could record a whole mux. At the time HDD storage wasn't up to it.

    No more missed schedules. no more ON Demand. You would have the lot on a home pvr.

    Sun 15 Oct 2017 20:27:17 #3 |
  4. gomezz

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    If they sorted out catch up viewing rights for *all* programmes then a 0B drive would suffice for home viewing devices.

    Sun 15 Oct 2017 20:42:27 #4 |
  5. grahamlthompson

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    gomezz - 17 minutes ago  » 
    If they sorted out catch up viewing rights for *all* programmes then a 0B drive would suffice for home viewing devices.

    Only given enough currently expensive NVram memory to buffer shortcomings in your ISP service. Currently in my experience ISP delivered content reliability falls far short of the reliability of direct broadcast services. Speaking as a retired National Grid Engineer if the electricity supply to your property failed as often as my ISP service even for a few minutes there would be a massive backlash.

    ISP delivered services have a long way to go to match the reliability of your electricity supply and direct broadcast services (which of course can afford alternative standby power supply sources to maintain broadcast services).

    Consider the last time you lost your power supply compared to the last time you last your mains power and in the fact that if you lose your mains supply you also lose your internet delivered content.

    Of course if some one hits a cable feeding your property or a lightning strike take out your power supply then you cannot access live TV OR isp delivered content either.

    Of course given enough investment it would be possible to create to give the required fault cover for instance to cover multiple faults (like in extreme weather) to cover an area area as say The West Midlands which is already covered). To provide duplicate cover to your house would be completely impractical.

    ISP viewing is fine, it no way can provide the sort of reliability required for a PSB direct broadcast service.

    Sun 15 Oct 2017 21:13:39 #5 |
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    Faust

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    I know it's a cliché but I simply don't know how I ever found time to work. Graham is right about retirement, I've no idea where my days go to.

    I struggle more now to watch my recorded programmes than I ever did when I was working.

    Regarding BB reliability though - I have to say I have found BT to be very reliable indeed (touch wood).

    Sun 15 Oct 2017 22:27:06 #6 |
  7. gomezz

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    SSD is now cheap enough and reliable enough provide sufficient memory for caching / buffering streamed video. Not to mention that how are you going to spin those hard disks if you are suffering from a power cut? Just as you can go to battery back up power then you can fall back on a mobile internet connection if your broadband service is interrupted.

    Mon 16 Oct 2017 8:39:24 #7 |
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    Pollensa1946

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    BTW the estimate for availability of a 40TB drive is 2025.

    http://www.datacenterdynamics.com/content-tracks/servers-storage/western-digital-to-roll-out-mamr-storage-by-2019-40tb-hard-drives-by-2025/99123.fullarticle

    I defy anyone to guess what domestic PVRs will look like then, or even if they are required.

    Mon 16 Oct 2017 9:22:10 #8 |
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    Pollensa1946

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    Faust - 10 hours ago  » ...I have found BT to be very reliable indeed...

    Yes, I've been with their fibre service for 2 years now. After 1 year I renewed for another 18 months. Never had one minute of problems.

    Mon 16 Oct 2017 9:27:14 #9 |
  10. aldaweb

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    Faust - 20 hours ago  » 

    Regarding BB reliability though - I have to say I have found BT to be very reliable indeed (touch wood).

    I must say my OH has the opposite experience with BT. They put her on a fibre connection after a complaint to CEO, but it's back in the exchange still, so no better than ADSL, constantly drops altogether and speed is atrocious. Catchup frequently buffers or is unusable at all. If she needs to download anything like a MacOS update she has to come and use my Virgin connection.
    But then she is in a rural area without the option of cable and miles from the exchange.

    Back to the topic though, these discs could be really useful for offline storage.

    Mon 16 Oct 2017 19:29:16 #10 |

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