Motion "stutters" when playing MKV files. « My Humax Forum

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Motion "stutters" when playing MKV files.

(27 posts)
  1. paulrichardson

    paulrichardson

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    Hi Guys,

    I'm getting issues when watching MKV files on my HDR1000S.

    It's not all the time, but for example, if a car drives across the screen, it goes by in a series of jerks.

    The rest of the action is OK.

    I copy the MKVs onto the hard drive of the Humax and play them from there.

    If anyone has any clues as to why this happens (and a cure if possible) I would love to hear from you.

    Regards,

    Paul

    Wed 6 Mar 2019 21:10:52 #1 |
  2. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    paulrichardson - 58 minutes ago  » 
    Hi Guys,
    I'm getting issues when watching MKV files on my HDR1000S.
    It's not all the time, but for example, if a car drives across the screen, it goes by in a series of jerks.
    The rest of the action is OK.
    I copy the MKVs onto the hard drive of the Humax and play them from there.
    If anyone has any clues as to why this happens (and a cure if possible) I would love to hear from you.
    Regards,
    Paul

    What framerate are they if you open the file using mediainfo and choose the tree option in view. also post the Video compression and audio compression codec. Hint in tree view you can post the file analysis in by exporting the results to a text file.

    https://mediaarea.net/en/MediaInfo

    Wed 6 Mar 2019 22:12:55 #2 |
  3. paulrichardson

    paulrichardson

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    I'll get media info and see if I get the results mentioned,

    Thanks,

    Paul

    Wed 6 Mar 2019 22:52:02 #3 |
  4. paulrichardson

    paulrichardson

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    Hi Graham,
    Here are the results from mediainfo.
    Hope they made more sense to you than they do to me.
    Regards,
    Paul

    Attachments

    1. Example.txt (2.9 KB, 7 downloads) 1 week old
    Thu 7 Mar 2019 15:29:10 #4 |
  5. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    The problem is down to the framerate

    Video
    ID : 1
    Format : AVC
    Format/Info : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile : High@L3.1
    Format settings : CABAC / 5 Ref Frames
    Format settings, CABAC : Yes
    Format settings, RefFrames : 5 frames
    Codec ID : V_MPEG4/ISO/AVC
    Duration : 1 h 24 min
    Bit rate : 3 044 kb/s
    Width : 1 280 pixels
    Height : 720 pixels
    Display aspect ratio : 16:9
    Frame rate mode : Constant
    Frame rate : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
    Color space : YUV
    Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0
    Bit depth : 8 bits
    Scan type : Progressive
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame) : 0.138
    Stream size : 1.81 GiB (98%)
    Language : English
    Default : Yes
    Forced : No

    Because all UK services are 50Hz based the built in chip can't cope properly with 24Hz. Because 24 doesn't go into 50 evenly the refresh rate is increased to 60Hz and slowed down by dropping some frame (drop frame),

    This results in the skipping you see on panning shots.

    Some kit can cope better than others. My laptop with hdmi minimises this effect. Ideally you need a media player that can output 720p at 24 or 48 fps. These are hard to find.

    Alternatively you might be able to recode to 50i using suitable sofware.

    Google 24p to 50i conversion.

    Try a trial download of Videoredo TV Suite

    TVSuite V5 - 5.1.2.731 (Released 2015-05-30)

    [Enhancement] Profile: Added ability to change frame rates when recoding.

    Thu 7 Mar 2019 17:36:42 #5 |
  6. paulrichardson

    paulrichardson

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    Hi Graham,

    Many thanks for your "usual" comprehensive reply.

    I'm guessing the 24Hz framerate is as a result of many of my files originating in the U.S. They always seem to do something different to us.

    If I was to convert an MKV to another format, would that make any difference, or will the framerate, get carried through to the conversion?

    Regards,

    Paul

    P.S.

    I've got Any Video Converter on my PC and I've discovered that in the Video options I can change the framerate to 50. However, I've started the conversion and it's going to take about an hour for a video which runs for about 80 minutes.

    Do you have experience with the framerate converter you mentioned, if so, do you think it would be any quicker?

    Paul

    Thu 7 Mar 2019 19:51:38 #6 |
  7. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    paulrichardson - 1 hour ago  » 
    Hi Graham,
    Many thanks for your "usual" comprehensive reply.
    I'm guessing the 24Hz framerate is as a result of many of my files originating in the U.S. They always seem to do something different to us.
    If I was to convert an MKV to another format, would that make any difference, or will the framerate, get carried through to the conversion?
    Regards,
    Paul
    P.S.
    I've got Any Video Converter on my PC and I've discovered that in the Video options I can change the framerate to 50. However, I've started the conversion and it's going to take about an hour for a video which runs for about 80 minutes.
    Do you have experience with the framerate converter you mentioned, if so, do you think it would be any quicker?
    Paul

    Nothing to do with the US. It's down to the fact that most of the content is derived from blu-ray. The blue-ray spec for full HD (1920 x 1080) only supports up to 1080p24. Which is what you get on a blue-ray disk albeit at a much higher bitrate than HD broadcasts.

    Though the spec does support 720p (1280 x 720) at 50fps. This is the same as HD broadcast content using the AVC/H264 video compression codec, though no UK broadcaster ever used 720p50 (because 1920 x 1980 sounds superior (it's not for much content)

    There is a later spec that supports Full-HD progressive at 50.60 fps.

    Recoding video is processor intensive so your question is impossible to answer. It depends on the amount of memory your PC has and the processor and speed of the storage options.

    If you have a a laptop with a sort of spec you can get at sub £1000,00 prices you might have to let it work overnight.

    For example my Core I7 laptop with a 2TB SSD boots Windows 64 in about 10 seconds.

    One hour seems pretty quick to me. To get any faster you need something much quicker and more expensive. . It's still faster than real time.

    Recoding the framerate takes a long time, changing the container from say .MKV to say .ts is quick because the video is not recoded at all.

    Leave it overnight and check if the problem is solved,

    Thu 7 Mar 2019 21:33:03 #7 |
  8. paulrichardson

    paulrichardson

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    Hi Graham,

    Thanks for the Information, it's much appreciated.

    An idea comes to mind, if Blue-ray players use 24, could you get a blue-ray player with a USB port and play MKVs through that?

    Regards,

    Paul

    Fri 8 Mar 2019 8:48:32 #8 |
  9. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    paulrichardson - 1 hour ago  » 
    Hi Graham,
    Thanks for the Information, it's much appreciated.
    An idea comes to mind, if Blue-ray players use 24, could you get a blue-ray player with a USB port and play MKVs through that?
    Regards,
    Paul

    I have a LG smart bluray player. Unfortunately 24p plays at 50fps - 1080p50 for 1920 x 1080. .MKV is just a container for compressed video and audio content.

    In your case the video is AVC - advanced Video Codec - aka H264/AVC and the audio is stereo AAC Advanced audio codec. Freeview-HD uses aac audio (up to 5.1 channels).

    See

    https://www.techsmith.com/blog/video-file-formats/

    Fri 8 Mar 2019 10:06:02 #9 |
  10. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    Paul If you are prepared to buy a blu-ray player I have a work around provided your PC has a DVD burner or you can connect one by usb.

    Blu-ray players will play back HD burnt to a DVD blank if AVCHD format is used. Burnable DVD blanks cost as little as 16p. Of course your file needs to fit on a DVD blank. (Max 4.7GB). Your file will fit easily.

    AVCHD supports 720p 1280 x 720 at 29.97 and 50/60 fps and 1080i (1920 x 1080 at 29.97 and 50/60 fps.

    AVCHD was jointly developed by Sony and Panasonic to allow footage from HD camcorders to be burnt to cheap DVD blanks without the need for a blu-ray burner.

    You need two free items of software

    TSmuxerGUI

    https://www.videohelp.com/software/tsMuxeR

    and IMGburn

    http://www.imgburn.com/

    Briefly you drag your file onto TSmuxerGUI. Select AVCHD output and create a disk image in .iso format. Because TSmuxer does not recode creating the image file only takes a very short time.

    IMG burn is used to burn the disk image to a DVD blank.

    Once burnt any blu-ray player should playback the disk at the correct framerate

    There's lots of help for both the above items on the internet.

    If you get stuck I can walk you through step by step by posting screen grabs.

    This tells you what each of the common containers can handle Video and Audio wise

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_codecs

    Fri 8 Mar 2019 10:59:22 #10 |

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